I am a graphic and web designer based in Southern Florida. Over the last 10 years, I’ve had the opportunity to make web designs for several companies and countless industries; which has given me my strong extensive web designing knowledge and technical skills, I have also earned a degree in web design and graphics. My specialties include web design, Wix websites (including mobile), SEO and marketing material such as brochures, catalogs, banners, banner ads, emails, flyers pdf’s (including ebooks), social media graphics, business cards, branding, and album art. My favorite projects includes Wix web design (in which I have earned Wix...

While legal considerations might be your biggest worry, making your site more accessible is simply good customer service. More than 39 million Americans are blind and another 246 million have "low vision," Another one million are deaf in the U.S. Add to that people with mobility issues that prevent them from using their hands and that's a huge portion of the country's buying power.
Aloha Tatiana! I wish your questions had straightforward easy answers – and if you are government funded it kind of is. (See here: https://www.ada.gov/websites2_prnt.pdf) if you are not government funded, this is something that is currently being debated in the legal system. That being said, the WCAG 2.0 guidelines are a good set of guidelines to help protect yourself if you feel you should. (You can see more on WCAG here: https://www.yokoco.com/find-out-how-to-make-your-website-compliant/)
The Department has assembled an official online version of the 2010 Standards to bring together the information in one easy-to-access location.  It provides the scoping and technical requirements for new construction and alterations resulting from the adoption of revised 2010 Standards in the final rules for Title II (28 CFR part 35) and Title III (28 CFR part 36).
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